Sunday, February 12, 2017

Reflections: Neuromancer

Neuromancer was the first book to win the "triple crown" of the science fiction genrethe Nebula Award, the Philip K. Dick Award, and the Hugo Award.  It's an impressive achievement for a mildly coherent book.  Considering the book was written in 1984 testifies to the author's vision, but it seemed obvious to me that these ideas were so new it was a challenge to actually write about them.

Neuromancer can certainly be lauded for its prescience.  Its influence in the science fiction genrewhich can be seen in films like The Matrix and Inception and in books like Ready Player Oneis noteworthy.  As far as I know, the premise of Neuromancer was ground-breaking.  "Cyberspace," "the matrix," and virtual worlds weren't fully unexplored at the time of its publication.  All of this is admirable from a creative standpoint; I want to give credit where credit is due.  Yet, I found the narrative of Neuromancer to be at times confusing and illusory.  There were many times I genuinely did not know what was happening, even after re-reading certain passages or paragraphs several times.  I wouldn't consider myself a novice reader, but this one sometimes left me perplexed.

Furthermore, the main protagonist of Neuromancer is hardly someone I would sympathize with.  He spends half the book on drugs.  The world of Neuromancer, at least the world presented to the reader, is dark and squalid.  The relationships between characters are barely human, and it all leaves the reader feeling as alone as the characters.  This book isn't very fun to read.  I don't need a "toothpaste commercial," but I also am fine with leaving such miserable and broken characters behind when I've finished a book like Neuromancer.

Appearing on a great many "best of" science fiction book lists, I figured I would see what Neuromancer had to offer.  I now know it has a lot to offer in creativity and futurism but a little less to offer in terms of narrative and enjoyment.  The book gave me a few things to think about but nothing to really sustain my curiosity.  I can say I've read it, but I can't say I liked it.

Other Topics of Interest:
Reflections: Ready Player One
Reflections: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
Reflections: A Canticle for Leibowitz

No comments:

Post a Comment