Friday, November 21, 2014

Reflections: Mass Effect: Revelation

I have tried reading books based on popular video game series before, including World of Warcraft: Tides of Darkness by Aaron Rosenberg and Starcraft: Liberty's Crusade by Jeff Grubb.  Both books were very poor.  They're more concerned about maintaining a fast pace than developing characters and providing action set pieces than intriguing plot.  It really is a shame because both of those books come from mythologies which are robust and interesting.  I wasn't expecting A Canticle for Leibowitz when I read either one, but I was hopeful they wouldn't be written strictly for an audience which just hit puberty.  When I finally decided to read Mass Effect: Revelation I did so with my previous experiences in mind and with hope the book would be a little bit better than the others which share a similar sub-genre. 

The greatest praise I can give to Mass Effect: Revelation is that it's not terrible.  I loved the Mass Effect series of games.  Their storylines, their characters, and their lore rival some of the greatest science fiction tales ever created.  I wanted to get back into the universe, and with the next game's release date still under wraps, and more than likely quite a ways off, reading Mass Effect: Revelation, which is a prequel to the original Mass Effect game, seemed like a perfect way to do it.  The book doesn't in anyway match the game seriers's incredible experience, but it's a mildly entertaining addition to the overall universe nonetheless. 

Like any prequel, Mass Effect: Revelation spends most of its time providing insights into characters the reading audience, who have most definitely played the games, already know about.  Anderson, Sanders, Saren, these are names the readers will already be familiar with.  Saren is the most compelling to read about it in the book, albeit mostly one-sided and uncomplicated.  Anderson and Sanders follow unsurprising character tropes, and their relationship is largely uninteresting. 

The story itself has the requisite science fiction mystery and mercenaries.  Again, no real surprises to be found.  The book's biggest asset isn't its story or characters but its setting.  The Mass Effect universe, as I mentioned previously, is incredibly robust, which I love spending time in.  As seems to often be the case for many books, there is a mad rush toward the end to bring the plot to a close.  It felt like the author was working under a rigid deadline; I don’t know if that’s actually true. 

There is no reason to read Mass Effect: Revelation unless you've played the game series and loved it.  I enjoyed the book as much as I did mainly and mostly for that reason.  I do think the book is better written than World of Warcraft: Tides of Darkness and Starcraft: Liberty's Crusade, but it doesn't exactly stand head and shoulders above them.  I'm prone to read the other Mass Effect books which have been published in hopes they'll also not be terrible as I bide my time before the next Mass Effect game releases.

Other Topics of Interest:
Reflections: A Canticle for Leibowitz
Reflections: The Moon is a Harsh Mistress
3 Reasons Why We Need & Love Stories

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